Student Use Design Thinking to Improve ‘Farm-to-Table’ Experience

Student riding her project she made in Design Studies 341

A four-week summer course provided students with an inside-look at solving real problems using the Design Thinking’s “innovate-prototype-test” process. Design Studies and Engineer majors enrolled in DS 341: Design Thinking for Transformation focused on how to improve the farmer’s market experience for consumers.

How might we…?

Class was held in the recently opened UW MakerSpace. The space’s cutting-edge, rapid prototyping equipment and the creative power of Design Thinking allowed student teams to design a range of creative—and real—solutions to community issues. Take a look at the teams who found answers by asking the open ended question, “how might we…?”

The Final Team Presentations

Team “Circuit of Life” asked how might we educate kids on urban sustainable agriculture in order to foster a sense of community and promote farm-to-table?

Final produced product: Introducing, the AquaCIRCUIT, an aquaponics gardening system that is affordable for classrooms and educational. Made from easy-to-obtain materials, it provides a visual ecosystem designed to produce healthy eating options.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Team “Stitching Stories with Quilt” asked how might we illuminate stories and identities to connect and foster relationships between locals, vendors, and their products?

Final produced product: An app, kiosk, card, and bag information system that delivers stories to customers.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Team “Produce to Pez” asked how might we educate kids on urban sustainable agriculture in order to foster a sense of community and promote farm-to-table?

Final produced product: A life-size Pez dispenser that safely stores and distributes fresh produce to provide a fun interaction for children and their communities.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Team “Produce Pal” asked how might we celebrate a vendor’s product display while streamling the established process?

Final produced product: A flexible system that combines bins, displays, and cooling features that farmer’s market vendors can use from farm to market.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Team “Beyond the Farm” asked how might we create a memorable experience that encourages the discovery of the advantages of farm fresh food?

Final produced product: A lightweight garden cart that delivers the farm experience to children in area schools, daycare facilities, and camps.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Team “Charms from the Farms” asked how might we give people a reason to stay and come by?

Final produced product: A charm collection reward system that connects buyers to farmers as well as a website with farm facts and recipes.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *