Sigan Hartley

Sigan Hartley

100 Women Chair in Human Ecology Associate Professor, Human Development and Family Studies Chair of Graduate Program, Waisman Center Investigator
4101 Nancy Nicholas Hall 1300 Linden Drive
Office Hours
Email to set up appointment
608-265-5424

My research seeks to promote health and well-being in individuals with developmental disabilities and their families across the life course. My research focuses on developmental disabilities such as autism spectrum disorder, Down syndrome, and fragile X syndrome. I am interested in understanding how biological, cognitive, and behavioral factors interact with the environmental context, including the family, support services, and broader community, to contribute to health and well-being in children and adults with developmental disabilities and their parents. My research employs multifaceted methodologies (e.g., daily diaries, medical and public record reviews, observational coding systems, physiological measures, biological markers), using a range of analytic approaches (e.g., multilevel longitudinal modeling and survival analyses).

SiganHartleyCV2016

 

“Sigan Hartley and her students study the  resources and contexts underlying positive well-being in individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members.  Our research investigates many aspects of individual well-being and family relationships, such as marital quality, parent-child interactions, healthy aging, mental health conditions, and stress and coping. Below, we highlight two current research projects that our lab is involved in.
Family Dynamics and Autism
Currently, we are conducting a 5 year study on Family Outcomes in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) funded by the National Institute of Health (NIMH R01MH099190; PI: Hartley). The goal of this study is to examine how the lives of parents and children with ASD are connected and influence functioning and well-being.  Findings from the study can be used to identify avenues for supporting families and improving current interventions and services. Currently, 300 families from across Wisconsin are participating in this study.  More information: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/hartleylab/index.htm
Alzheimer’s Disease and Down syndrome
Adults with Down syndrome evidence accelerated aging, including an earlier onset and increased incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. The early onset and increased incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in Down syndrome is attributed to the overproduction of amyloid-β due to the triplication of chromosome 21, which contains the gene for the amyloid precursor protein.  Interestingly, some adults, including those with Down syndrome, accumulate amyloid-β plaques and tangles for years without showing clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, yet others progress quickly to dementia.  We are collaborating with researchers at UW-Madison in a multi-site study to understand the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology and better understand this variability. This study is funded by the National Institute of Health (U01AG051406 to W. Klunk, B. Handen, & B. Christian). More information:http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/amyloid/ 

More information about the Hartley Lab: http://hartleylab.wordpress.com/

 

Representative Publications from Hartley Lab:

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Mihaila, I., & Hartley, S.L. (in press). Parental sleep quality and behavior problems of children with autismAutism: The International Journal Of Research And Practice.

Hartley, S.L., Papp, L.M., Blumenstock, S., Floyd, F., & Goetz, G . (in press). The effect of daily challenges in children with autism on parents’ couple problem-solving interactions. Journal of Family Psychology.

Hartley, S.L., Papp, L., & Bolt, D. (2016). Spillover of marital interactions and parenting stress in families of children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Epub ahead of print.

Taylor, J., Burke, M.M., Smith, L.E., & Hartley, S.L. (2016). Families of adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities. In R. Hodapp (Ed.). International review of research in developmental disabilities, Vol 41 (pp. 1-29). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.

Hartley, S. L., & Schultz, H. M. (2015). Support needs of fathers and mothers of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 45(6):1636-48. doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2318-0.

Hartley, S. L., Mihaila, I., Otalor-Fadner, H., & Bussanich, P. M. (2014). Division of labor in families of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Family Relations. 63(5):627-638.

Hartley, S. L., Schaidle, E. M., & Burnson, C. F. (2013). Parental attributions for the behavior problems of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 34, 651-660.

Hartley, S. L., Barker, E. T., Baker, J. K., Seltzer, M. M., & Greenberg, J. S. (2012). Marital satisfaction and life circumstances of grown children with autism across 7 years. Journal of Family Psychology, 26, 688-697.

Hartley, S. L., Seltzer, M. M., Head, L., & Abbeduto, L. (2012). Psychological well-being in fathers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, and autism. Family Relations, 61, 327-342.

Hartley, S. L., Barker, E. T., Seltzer, M. M., Floyd, F. J., & Greenberg, J. S. (2011). Marital satisfaction and parenting experiences of mothers and fathers of adolescents and adults with autism. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 116, 81-95.

Barker, E. T., Hartley, S. L., Seltzer, M. M., Floyd, F. J., Greenberg, J. S., & Orsmond, G. I. (2011). Trajectories of emotional well-being in mothers of adolescents and adults with autism. Developmental Psychology, 47, 551-561.

Hartley, S. L., Seltzer, M. M., Barker, E. T., & Greenberg, J. S. (2011). Marital quality and families of children with developmental disabilities. In R. Hodapp, (Eds.) International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Volume 41. Elsevier.

Hartley, S. L., & Seltzer, M. M. (2011). What forms of living are useful and available for adults with ASC? In S. Bolte, & J. Hallmayer (Eds.), Autism Spectrum Conditions: International Experts answer your Questions on Autism, Asperger syndrome and PDD-NOS. Hogrefe.

Hartley, S. L., Barker, E. T., Seltzer, M. M., Floyd, F. J., Orsmond, G. I., Greenberg, J. S. et al. (2010). The relative risk and timing of divorce in families of children with an autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Family Psychology, 24, 449-457.

Hartley, S. L., & Sikora, D. S. (2010). Detecting autism spectrum disorder in children with intellectual disability: Which DSM-IV-TR criteria are most useful? Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 25, 85-97.

Hartley, S. L., & Sikora, D. S. (2009). Sex differences in autism spectrum disorders: An examination of developmental functioning, autistic symptoms and coexisting behavior problems in toddlersJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39, 1715-1722.

Hartley, S. L. & Sikora, D. S. (2009). Which DSM-IV-TR criteria best differentiate high- functioning autism spectrum disorder from ADHD and anxiety disorders in older children? Autism: The International Journal of Research and Practice, 13, 485-509.

Hartley, S. L., Sikora, D. S., & McCoy, R. (2008). Prevalence and risk factors of maladaptive behaviors in young children with Autistic DisorderJournal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52, 819-829.

Hartley, S. L., Buckendorf, B., Haines, K., Hall, T., & Sikora, D. S. (2008). The Oral and Written Language Scales: Is it useful for older children with autism spectrum disorder? Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 137-146.

Sikora, D. S., Hall, T., Hartley, S. L., Gerrard-Morris, A., & Cagel, S. (2008). Does parent report of behavior differ across Autism Diagnostic and Observation Schedule-Generic Classifications: Analysis of scores from the Child Behavior Checklist and Gilliam Autism Rating Scale. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 38, 440-448.

Sikora, D. S., Hartley, S. L., McCoy, R., Gerrard-Morris, A., & Dill, K. (2008). The performance of children with mental health disorders on the ADOS-G: A question of diagnostic utility. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 188-197.

Fragile X syndrome

Hartley, S.L., Wheeler, A., Mailick, M.R., Raspa, M., Mihaila, I., Bishop, E., & Bailey, D. (2015). Autism symptoms across adulthood in men with Fragile X syndrome: Findings from a Cross-sectional study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(11):3668-79. doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2513-7.

Hartley, S. L., Seltzer, M. M., Hong, J., Greenberg, J. S., Almeida, D., Coe, C., & Abbeduto, L. (2012). Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome: A diathesis-stress model. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 36, 53-61.

Hartley, S. L., Seltzer, M. M., Raspa, M., Olmsted, M. G., Bishop, E. E., & Bailey, D. B. (2011). Exploring the adult life for men and women with fragile X syndrome: Results from a national survey. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 116, 16-35.

Mental Health and Intellectual and Developmental Disability

Hickey, E.J., & Hartley, S.L. (in press). Conservatorship. In E. Braatan and B. Willoughby (Eds.), Encyclopedia of intellectual and developmental disorders. Sage Publications.

Hartley, S. L., Esbensen, A. J., Shalev, R ., Vincent, L., Mihaila, I. , & Bussanich, P. ( 2015). Cognitive behavioral therapy for depressed adults with mild intellectual disability: A Pilot Study. Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 8, 72-97.

Milevicuite, I., & Hartley, S.L. (2015) Self-reported versus informant-reported depressive symptoms in adults with mild intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 59(2):158-69. doi: 10.1111/jir.12075.

Esbensen, A. J., & Hartley, S. L. (2013). Mood disorders. In J. L. Taylor, W. R. Lindsay, R. Hastings, & C. Hatton (Eds.), Psychological Therapies for Adult with Intellectual Disabilities. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2006). A review of the reliability and validity of Likert-type scales for people with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 50, 813-827.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2009). Depression in adults with mild intellectual disability: Role of stress, attributions, and coping. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 114, 147-160.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2009). Stressful social interactions experienced by adults with mild intellectual disability. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 114, 71-84.

Hartley, S. L., & Beirgenhon, D. (2009). Nonverbal social skills of adults with mild intellectual disability diagnosed with depressionJournal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2, 11-28.

Hartley, S. L., Lickel Hayes, A., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2008). Reassurance-seeking and depression in adults with mild intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52, 917-929.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2008). Coping strategies of adults with mild intellectual disability for stressful social interactions. Journal of Mental Health Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1, 109-127.

Hartley, S. L., Horrell, S. V., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2007). Science to practice in intellectual disability: The role of empirically supported treatments. In J. W. Jacobson, J. A. Mulick, & J. Rojahn (Eds), Handbook of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (pp. 425-444). Norwell, MA: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2007). Staff-averse challenging behavior in older adults with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20, 519-528.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E., Jr. (2006). A review of the reliability and validity of Likert-type scales for people with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 50, 813-827.

Hartley, S. L., & MacLean, W. E. Jr. (2005). Perceptions of stress and coping strategies among adults with mild mental retardation: Insight into psychological distress. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 110, 285-297.

Hartley, S. L., MacLean, W. E., Jr., Butler, M., Thompson, T. & Zarcone, J. (2005). Maladaptive behaviors and risk factors among the genetic subtypes of Prader-Willi syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 136, 140-145.

Aging in Down Syndrome

Mihaila, I., Hartley, S.L., Handen, B.L., Bulova, P.D., Tumuluru, R.B., Devenny, D.A. et al. (in press). Leisure activity and caregiver involvement in middle-aged and older adults with Down syndrome. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Esbensen, A.J., Hooper, S.R., Fidler, D., Hartley, S.L., Edgin, J., d’Ardhuy, X.L., et al. (in press). Outcome measures for clinical trials in Down syndrome. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Lao, P.J., Betthauser, T.J., Hilmer, A.T., Price, J., Klunk, W., Mihaila, I.,  Higgins, A.T., Bulova, P.D., Hartley, S.L. et al. (2016). The effects of normal aging on amyloid-β deposition in a population of nondemented adults with Down syndrome as imaged by [11C] PIB. Alzheimer’s and Dementia, 12(4):380-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.05.013.

Hartley, S. L., Handen, B., Devenny, D. T., Christian, B. T., Hardison, R., Mihaila, I., Price, J. C., Cohen, A. D., Klunk, W. E., Mailick, M., & Johnson, S. (2014). Cognitive functioning in relation to the accumulation of brain β-amyloid in healthy adults with Down syndrome. Brain. 137(Pt 9):2556-63. doi: 10.1093/brain/awu173.

MacLean, W. E., Jr., & Hartley, S. L. (2005). Down syndrome. In N. J. Salkind (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Development (pp. 309-321). Oaks, CA: Sage.

Other

Rice, G. M., Raca, G., Jakielski, K. J., Laffin, J. J., Iyama-Kurtycz, C. M., Hartley, S. L. et al. (2012). Phenotype of FOXP2 haploinsufficiency in a mother and son. American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A 158A:174–181.

Amodio, D. M., Harmon-Jones, E., Devine, P. G., Curtin, J. J., Hartley, S. L., & Covert, A. E. (2004). Neural signals for the detection of unintentional race bias. Psychological Science, 15, 88-93.

Undergraduate Courses

HDFS 363: Development- Adolescence through Old Age, University of Wisconsin-Madison

HDFS 471: Parent-Child Relations, University of Wisconsin-Madison School

HDFS 592: Research Experience in HDFS

HDFS 501: Neurodevelopmental Conditions and the Family

Graduate Courses

Human Development and Family Studies 763: Families of Children with Disabilities, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Human Development and Family Studies 842: Parent-Child Relations across the Life course, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Human Development and Family Studies 865: Family Theory I, University of Wisconsin-Madison